EMPOWERING PATIENTS, ASSISTING CLINICIANS

ICARE’s intelligent control provides a movement that is neither always assistive nor always resistive. It is designed to provide an “assist as needed” approach similar to what a therapist provides physically and intuitively while gait training a patient.

The ICARE frees clinicians from hours of strenuous manual lifting and improves patient access to assistive technology, allowing them to improve their walking and fitness.

WHY ICARE?

The ICARE system’s motorised control has a sensor that automatically adjusts the level of support depending on the individual’s needs during exercise. Individuals can use ICARE in place of expensive robotic gait devices in specialised rehabilitation hospitals, medical fitness settings, outpatient therapy gyms, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and senior centres.

The ICARE also reduces the physical stresses caregivers who deliver traditional locomotive therapy may experience.

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Relearning to walk and remaining physically active are important rehabilitation goals for individuals with weakness, numbness or balance problems and those recovering from a disabling injury or illness. To regain walking ability, thousands of step-like movements are required to achieve lasting neuroplasticity gains. Often these individuals face barriers due to the lack of equipment that appropriately accommodates the needs of compromised muscles. Enter ICARE.

Developed at the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital and Research Institute in Lincoln, Nebraska, ICARE is a fully-integrated system that provides a safe, effective method for assisting patients with neuromuscular disorders resulting from stroke, TBI, partial SCI, and other injuries or diseases. ICARE’s intelligent control provides a movement that is neither always assistive or always resistive. It is designed to provide an “assist as needed” approach that is similar to what a therapist provides physically and intuitively while gait training a patient. The ICARE frees clinicians from hours of strenuous manual lifting and advancing of the legs and expands patient access to assistive technology, allowing them to improve their walking and cardiovascular fitness.

ICARE’s leg movements closely mimic the kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) patterns of walking. Noted in development studies, ICARE training can help individuals regain or retain the flexibility and strength required for walking, particularly if the muscle demands are customised to those with weakness during rehab. Special focus was applied during development to ensure the appropriate levels of assistance are available for individuals to accomplish the required repetitions, both with partial body weight support and motor-assistance from the footplates.

  • Forward and reverse motor assistance allows speeds up to 65 cycles per minute
  • Adaptive motor assistance automatically adjusts to suit the patient’s exercise needs
  • Single or dual leg training options accommodate a wide range of patient needs
  • Adjustable stride range from 18- 29 inch (45-73cm) with fingertip shift-on-the-fly controls
  • Dual action motion for a complete body workout
  • Contact and telemetry heart rate monitoring
  • Remote control for easy, unintrusive clinician adjustments
  • Passcode control allows usage as a standalone elliptical trainer
  • Infrared safety system shutdown reduces risk of injury

E875MA Elliptical

E875MU Body Unweighting System

  • Electronically controlled pneumatic height-adjustable seat provides ninety-degree rotation in either direction
  • Armrests flip up for easy patient access
  • Unweighting harness supports and lifts up to 180kg (400 lb) of patients‘ body weight

E875MP Ramp, Stairs, and Platform

  • Provides access for clients who use a wheelchair
  • Reduces the clinician’s risk of injury when transferring clients to the rest seat
  • Raises the clinician’s viewing position for unobstructed monitoring
Up to June 7, 2017

Awards

  • 2013 International daVinci Award, Recreation and Leisure category for Madonna ICARE by Sports Art. Michigan Chapter of the National MS Society. Dearborn, MI.

Patents

  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Nelson CA (2011). Rehabilitation and Exercise Machine. U.S. Patent 8,007,405.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Nelson CA (2012). Rehabilitation and Exercise Machine. U.S. Patent 8,177,688 B2.
  • Burnfield JM, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Nelson CA, Shu Y (2014). Improved Rehabilitation and Exercise Machine. Canadian Patent 2,776,626.

Manuscripts

  • Cesar GM, Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2017). Should gait outcomes be the primary focus in paediatric gait rehabilitation? Journal of Novel Physiotherapies, 7(3):1000342DOI: 10.4172/2165-7025.1000342
  • Burnfield JM, Cesar G, Buster TW, Irons SL, Nelson CA (2017). Kinematic and muscle demand similarities between motor-assisted elliptical training and walking: Implications for paediatric gait rehabilitation. Gait & Posture, 51:194-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.10.018.
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Goldman AJ, Corbridge LM, Hanigan K (2016). Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic muscle activation and stride characteristics during acute stroke rehabilitation. Human Movement Science. (47): 16-28. DOI: 10 1016/j.humov.2016.01.012
  • Irons SL, Brusola GA, Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2015). Novel ICARE Intervention Improves Six-Minute Walk Test and Oxygen Cost for an Individual with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal, 26(2):36-41. DOI: 10.1097/CPT.0000000000000007
  • Nelson CA, Stolle CJ, Burnfield JM, Buster TW (2015). Modification of the Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical (ICARE) system for paediatric therapy. Published online, ASME Journal of Medical Devices, 9(4): 6 pages. DOI: 10.1115/1.4030276.
  • Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Hildner GA, Shu Y (2014). Comparative analysis of speed’s impact on muscle demands during partial body weight support motor-assisted elliptical training, Gait & Posture. 39(1): 314-320.  DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.07.120
  • Buster TW, Burnfield JM, Taylor AP, Stergiou, N (2013). Lower extremity kinematics during walking and elliptical training in individuals with and without traumatic brain injury. Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy. 37(4): 176-186.  DOI: 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000022
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, Nelson CA (2011). Impact of elliptical trainer ergonomic modifications on perceptions of safety, comfort, workout and usability by individuals with physical disabilities and chronic conditions. Physical Therapy, 91(11)1604-1617.  DOI:https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20100332
  • Nelson CA, Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, Graham A (2011). Modified elliptical machine motor-drive design for assistive gait rehabilitation. Transactions of the ASME Journal of Medical Devices, 5:021001.1-021001.7. DOI:10.1115/1.4003693
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A (2010). Similarity of joint kinematics and muscle demands between elliptical training and walking: Implications for practice. Physical Therapy. 90(2). 289-305. DOI:https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20090033

 

Abstracts/Presentations

  • Cesar GM, Irons SL, Garbin A, Eckels E, Buster TW, Burnfield JM. Child with traumatic brain injury improved gait abilities following intervention with paediatric motor-assisted elliptical training: A case report (2017)Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association. San Antonio, TX, February 15-18, 2017.
  • Burnfield JM, Terryberry-Spohr L, Tran J (2016). Affordable Motor-assisted Elliptical Training to Improve Physical, Cognitive, Psychosocial and Health Outcomes Across Rehabilitation Continuum. 75-minute Symposium, Conference proceedings, 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM) 93rd Annual Conference: Progress in Rehabilitation Research. Chicago, IL, November 2.
  • Irons SL, Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Karkowski-Schelar E, Johns E (2016). Individuals with multiple sclerosis improved walking endurance and decreased fatigue following motor-assisted elliptical training intervention. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(10):e34. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.08.100
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Irons SL, Cesar GM, Nelson CA, Rech NR, Nichols EM (2016). Paediatric walking vs. training on prototype motor-assisted elliptical: Kinematic comparison at self-selected comfortable speed. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(10):e99. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.08.306
  • Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Cesar GM, Buster TW, Khot R, Nelson CA (2016). Pedi-ICARE training improves walking and endurance of child with cerebral palsy. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(12):e19-e20. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.09.053
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Irons SL, Rech N, Cesar GM, Pfeifer CM, Nelson CA (2016). Paediatric Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical for Walking and Fitness: Prototype Development and Biomedical Analysis[Abstract]. RESNA/NCART (Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America/National Coalition for Assistive and Rehab Technology) 2016 annual convention, July 10-14, Arlington, VA.
  • Pfeifer CM, Burnfield JM, Kota S, Buster TW, Irons SL, Rowen DA, Nelson CA (2016). Positive Reinforcement System Design for Therapeutic Devices [Abstract]. RESNA/NCART (Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America/National Coalition for Assistive and Rehab Technology) 2016 annual convention, July 10-14, Arlington, VA.
  • Pfeifer CM, Burnfield JM, Kota S, Buster TW, Irons SL, Sulski C, Nelson CA (2016). Design of a Custom Heart-Rate Control System for the Paediatric Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical [Abstract]. RESNA/NCART (Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America/National Coalition for Assistive and Rehab Technology) 2016 annual convention, July 10-14, Arlington, VA.
  • Buster TW, Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Nelson CA, Trejo LH, Leutzinger TJ (2016). Paediatric walking vs. training on a prototype motor-assisted elliptical: kinematic and EMG comparisons at self-selected fast speeds [Abstract]. Conference proceedings,2016 Annual Meeting Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society. Memphis, TN, May 17-20, 2016.
  • Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Buster TW (2016). Individual with progressive supranuclear palsy demonstrates improvements in walking distance and efficiency following a motor-assisted elliptical training intervention [Abstract]. Conference proceedings,9th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation. Philadelphia, PA, May 12, 2016.
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Irons SL (2016). Individuals post stroke improved walking endurance and efficiency following motor-assisted elliptical training intervention [Abstract]. Conference proceedings, 9th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation. Philadelphia, PA, May 12, 2016.
  • Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2016). Movement variability during walking and elliptical exercise for individuals with chronic severe traumatic brain injuries [Abstract]. Conference proceedings9th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation. Philadelphia, PA, May 12, 2016.
  • Nelson CA, Stolle CJ, Burnfield JM, Buster TW (2015). Synthesis of a rehabilitation mechanism replicating normal gait [Technical Paper]. Conference Proceedings, 14th World Congress in Mechanisms and Machine ScienceDOI: 10.6567/IFToMM.14TH.WC.OS1.016. Taipei, Taiwan, October 25-30, 2015.
  • Trejo LH, Buster TW, Stolle CJ, Nelson CA, Burnfield JM (2014). Influence of rocker and crank arm lengths on Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical (ICARE) coupler trajectories. Proceedings, Midwest BME Career Conference. p. 31
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Goldman AJ, Corbridge LM, Harper-Hanigan K (2016). Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic leg muscle activation, stride characteristics, and ratings of perceived exertion during acute stroke rehabilitation. Human Movement Science, 47:16-28. DOI: 10.1016/j.humov.2016.01.012.
  • Irons SL, Brusola GA, Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2015). Novel motor-assisted elliptical training intervention improves Six-Minute Walk Test and oxygen cost for an Individual with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal, 26: 36-41.
  • Nelson CA, Stolle CJ, Burnfield JM, Buster TW (2015). Modification of the Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical (ICARE) system for paediatric therapy. Published online, ASME Journal of Medical Devices. DOI: 10.1115/1.4030276.
  • Burnfield JM, Irons SL, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Hildner GA, Shu Y (2014). Comparative analysis of speed’s impact on muscle demands during partial body weight support motor-assisted elliptical training. Gait and Posture, 39(1):314-320. DOI: org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.07.120.
  • McCrory B, Harlow AH, Burnfield JM (2014). Musculoskeletal risk to physical therapists during overground gait training: A case report. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 10/2014; 58(1):1219-1223. DOI: 10.1177/1541931214581254.
  • McCrory B, Burnfield JM, Darragh A, Meza JL, Irons SI, Brusola G, Link AM. (2014). Work injuries among therapists in physical rehabilitation. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 10/2014; 58(1):1072-1076. DOI: 10.1177/1541931214581224.
  • Buster TW, Burnfield JM, Taylor AP, Stergiou, N (2013). Lower extremity kinematics during walking and elliptical training in individuals with and without traumatic brain injury. Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 37(4):176-86.
  • Burnfield JM, McCrory B, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Goldman AJ (2013). Comparative kinematic and electromyographic assessment of clinician- and device-assisted sit-to-stand transfers in patients with stroke. Physical Therapy, 93(10):1331-1341.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, McBride MM, Krause ME (2012). Kinematic and electromyographic analysis of normal and device-assisted sit to stand transfers. Gait and Posture, 36(3):516-522.
  • Burnfield JM, Nelson CA, Buster TW, Taylor AP (2012). Affordable technology addresses walking and fitness deficits across rehabilitation continuum of care. 10th Annual Conference of the American Medical Rehabilitation Providers Association. San Diego, CA.
  • Watt BP, Burnfield JM, Truemper EJ, Buster TW, Bashford GR (2012). Monitoring cerebral hemodynamics with transcranial doppler ultrasound during cognitive and exercise testing in adults following unilateral stroke. 34th Annual International IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference. San Diego, CA.
  • Yeseta MC, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Shu Y, Burnfield JM (2012). Exercise endurance and functional mobility improve for individuals with physical disabilities after training on a motorised elliptical. Online proceedings, Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America’s 2012 Annual Conference.
  • Nelson, CA. Burnfield JM (2012). Improved elliptical trainer biomechanics using a modified Cardan gear. Proceedings of the ASME 2012 International Design Engineering Technical Conference & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference [Conference Paper #: DETC2012-70439]. Chicago, IL.
  • Burnfield JM, Yeseta M, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Shu Y (2012). Individuals with physical limitations can benefit from training on a motorised elliptical for community-based exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 45(5 Supplement), pg. S360.
  • Taylor AP, Lowndes BR, Buster TW, Shu Y, Burnfield JM (2012). Speed’s impact on pedar pressures at varying levels of body weight supported ICARE training. Proceedings, Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society 2012 Annual Meeting, pg 139-140.
  • Shu Y, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2012). Clinicians’ motion and muscle activation patterns during body weight support treadmill training. Proceedings, Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society 2012 Annual Meeting, pgs. 230-231.
  • Buster TW, Goulet C, Shafer D, Burnfield JM (2012). Comparison of kinematic demands of walking and elliptical training between individuals with and without mild to moderate multiple sclerosis. Proceedings, Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society 2012 Annual Meeting, pgs. 232-233.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, Nelson CA (2011). Impact of elliptical trainer ergonomic modifications on perceptions of safety, comfort, workout and usability for people with physical disabilities and chronic conditions. Physical Therapy, 91(11): 1604-1617.
  • Nelson CA, Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, Graham A (2011). Modified elliptical machine motor-drive design for assistive gait rehabilitation. ASME Journal of Medical Devices, 5(2) May 20122: DOI: 10.1115/1.4003693.
  • Burnfield JM, Hildner GA, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Shu Y (2011). Speed’s impact on muscle demands during partial body weight supported training on a motorised elliptical. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92(10): 1700. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.07.045
  • Burnfield JM, Taylor AP, Buster TW, Shu Y, Goldman AJ, Nelson CA (2011). Use of Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical Trainer to Improve Walking and Fitness during Acute Stroke Rehabilitation. Stroke, 42(3), pg. e326.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Merriman L, Nelson CA (2010). Comparison of lower extremity electromyographic (EMG) demands during ICARE training and walking. Online Proceedings, American Society of Biomechanics 34th Annual Meeting, pgs. 334-335.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor AP, Merriman L, Nelson CA (2010). Comparison of lower extremity electromyographic (EMG) demands during ICARE training and walking. American Society of Biomechanics 2010 Annual Meeting.
  • Buster TW, Taylor AP, Frazier M, Burnfield JM (2010). Kinematic analysis of five cardiovascular exercisesOnline Proceedings, American Society of Biomechanics 34th Annual Meeting,pgs. 324-325.
  • Burnfield JM (2010). ICARE: An Affordable Technology Designed to Promote Walking and Cardiovascular Fitness During Rehabilitation and Following Discharge. 8th Annual Medical Rehabilitation Providers’ Association Educational Conference.
  • Burnfield JM, Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor AP (2010). Similarity of joint kinematics and muscle demands between elliptical training and walking: Implications for practice. Physical Therapy, 90(2):289-305.
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Taylor A, Keenan S, Shu Y, Nelson CA (2010). Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical (ICARE) Training: An Analysis of Lower Extremity Electromyographic (EMG) Demands with Varying Levels of Motor Assistance. Online Proceedings, Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America’s 2010 Annual Conference.
  • Shu Y, Buster TW, Taylor A, Keenan S, Nelson CA, Burnfield JM (2010). Ergonomic redesign of elliptical trainer to promote greater safety, comfort and usabilityOnline Proceedings, Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America’s 2010 Annual Conference.
  • Burnfield JM, Combs S, Finley M (2010). The Role of Biomechanics in the Management of Upper- and Lower-extremity Dysfunction: Emerging Interventions for Individuals with Neurological Involvement [2 hour short course]. Programme, 2010 Annual Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association, 46.
  • Burnfield JM. Development of the ICARE Trainer to Promote Gait and Cardiovascular Fitness in Individuals with Physical Disabilities (2010). Presented at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. Downey, CA. May 27, 2010.
  • Burnfield JM. Patient-Centered Rehabilitation Research (2010). Presented at Capital City Kiwanis. Lincoln, NE. May 18, 2010.
  • Burnfield JM (2010). Ergonomics in Health Care: Biomechanical Considerations. Presented at Wisconsin Physical Therapy Association. Green Bay, WS. April 15, 2010.
  • Burnfield JM (2010). Biomechanical Demands of Transfer and Gait Activities: Promoting Clinician Safety and Therapeutic Patient Outcomes. Presented at Tenth Annual Safe Patient Handling and Movement Conference. Lake Buena Vista, FL. March 31, 2010.
  • Burnfield JM, Roemmich RT, Scherr T, Buster TW (2009). Comparison of Vastus Lateralis and Medial Hamstring Electromyographic Activity Across Five Cardiovascular Exercises. Supplement to Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Volume 41(5), pgs. S568-569.
  • Buster TW, Roemmich RT, Doher NJ, Burnfield JM (2009). Comparison of Ankle Muscle Electromyographic Activity Across Five Cardiovascular Exercises. Supplement to Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Volume 41(5), pg. S569.
  • Taylor AP, Buster TW, Barber BR, Burnfield JM (2009). Comparison of Forefoot and Heel Pressures Across Fast Walking and Four Elliptical Trainer Conditions. Supplement to Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Volume 41(5), pg. S242.
  • Corbridge LM, Goldman AJ, Shu Y, Buster TW, Burnfield JM (2009). Clinician’s Muscle Effort During Partial Body Weight Support Treadmill Training: Is it Hard Work? Online Proceedings, American Physical Therapy Association’s 2009 Annual Conference and Exposition.
  • Burnfield JM, Barber BR, Buster TW, Taylor AP (2009). Plantar Pressures Vary Across Elliptical Trainers and Compared to Walking. Proceedings, Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society 14th Annual Meeting, 116-117.
  • Buster TW, Goldman AJ, Corbridge LM, Shu Y, Burnfield JM (2009). Partial Body Weight Support Treadmill Training: Clinician’s Upper Extremity Muscle Activation During Facilitation of Hemiparetic Limb Movement. Proceedings, Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society 14th Annual Meeting, pgs 258-259.
  • Burnfield JM, Goldman A (2009). The Physical Therapist’s Role in Community Based Wellness for Stroke Patients. Presented at Eighth Annual Nebraska Stroke Symposium-Present Challenges and Future Hopes. Omaha, NE. October 12, 2009.
  • Burnfield JM, Wilkinson H (2009). Breaking Down Barriers to Wellness and Fitness in Persons Living with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities: A Proactive Approach. Presented at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), College of Education and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Lincoln, NE. April 15, 2009.
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TR (2009). Neuroplasticity: Applying Guiding Principles to Help People Relearn to Walk Following an Injury. Presented at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), College of Education and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Lincoln, NE. April 8, 2009.
  • Kulig K, Burnfield JM (2008). The role of biomechanics in orthopaedic and neurological rehabilitation. Acta of Bioengineering and Biomechanics, 10:1-14.
  • Kulig K, Burnfield JM (2008). Mechanistic and interventional aspects of movement disorders: The role of biomechanics. Proceedings of the International Congress of the Polish Society of Biomechanics 2008, 11-18.
  • Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Provorse A, Takahashi S (2007). Muscular demands during elliptical training compared to overground walking. Physiotherapy, 93(Supplement 1), pg. S179.
  • Takahashi S, Burnfield JM, Buster TW, Provorse AR (2007). Comparison of Gluteal Muscle Electromyographic Activity across Five Cardiovascular Exercises in Healthy Young Adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Volume 39(5), pg. S255.

Robert J. McIver, PT, DPT, NCS
Director of Clinical Technology and Wellness
Brooks Neuro-Recovery Center Jacksonville, FL

We have had the ICARE at Brooks Rehabilitation for over 2 years now. It is one of our most highly utilised pieces of equipment. We use the ICARE to treat patients with any gait or balance impairments regardless of diagnosis; Orthopaedic, Neurologic, Geriatric, Bariatric, and Paediatric. The patients and staff love using the ICARE due to the versatility it provides as well as the ease of set up. The adjustability of speed and stride length ensure that training is customised to each patient and their specific needs. We have patients who come in just to use the ICARE in our independent programme to maintain their health and quality of life.

The staff that uses it enjoy that we can provide longer sessions of stepping with less assist from other staff and less need to muscle through a locomotor session on the treadmill. It also provides a way to increase stepping in a safe environment that we can work on functional tasks such as reaching and trunk rotations while the lower legs are moving to increase dynamic balance. Mostly, staff and patients like the fact that regardless of the level of function of the patient the ICARE provides the means to deliver a cardiovascular workout that no other machine can deliver.

We had a patient with a lumbar plexus palsy that was not able to generate a static EMG in his doctor’s office, but when using the ICARE at a higher speed was able to generate a dynamic EMG. After months of rehab using the ICARE the patient was able to return to running and playing with his children with no assistive devices. His prognosis prior to this discovery and intervention would be all standing and walking tasks would need a locking knee brace.

Overall, the ICARE is a very affordable piece of rehabilitation technology that allows any clinician to deliver a highly intense intervention that can be geared toward any patient population.

Liza Reidel
Executive Director

NextStep Orlando (Previously Project Walk Orlando)

Project Walk Orlando’s mission is to provide those living with spinal cord injuries the opportunity to achieve their greatest recovery potential and an increased quality of life. Our mission is fulfilled by providing specialised one-on-one, cutting-edge, aggressive and comprehensive exercise-based programmes. The ICARE system has played an integral role in helping our clients and staff achieve this mission.

The ICARE system is utilised on a daily basis during clients exercise programmes to provide an intensive cardiovascular and gait training workout. From a client and staff perspective, the ICARE has been a successful addition to our facility, allowing for an efficient setup and for the trainer to ensure the client is in a comfortable and safe position. Clients are able to achieve thousands of steps on the ICARE system which supports the repetitive movement science of SCI training. In addition to this, clients are able to make use of the feedback function where if they move the elliptical faster than the motor speed the machine lets them know. This function always increases their effort and motivation during the workout.

Various factors weighed into the decision to fundraise and purchase the ICARE System for PWO. These include the systems ability to improve our clients’ fitness, circulation and function in a manner which is less labour intensive on trainers. The ICARE can provide our clients with 1000’s of steps that would typically require multiple trainers, assistants and a lot of time.

HEAR FROM PATIENTS

BRANDON & TIFFANY
Parents Of TBI Patient

SHAUNA
Stroke Patient

ALEX
Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury Patient

ICARE SYSTEM FEATURES

HAND HOLDS

LEVELS OF ASSISTANCE

ADJUSTABLE SPEED

STEP LENGTH

FOOT PEDALS

Judith M. Burnfield, Ph.D., P.T., is Director of the Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Director of the Movement and Neurosciences Center and the Clifton Chair in Physical Therapy and Movement Sciences at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. Dr. Burnfield earned her Ph.D. in Biokinesiology from the University of Southern California and completed her post-doctoral training at the Pathokinesiology Laboratory at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. Dr. Burnfield holds adjunct faculty appointments at Creighton University, the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, University of Nebraska Medical Center, and the University of South Dakota.

Dr. Burnfield’s research aims to 1) enhance the independence and quality of life of individuals with and without disabilities, emphasising locomotive disorders such as gait; 2) prevent secondary medical complications in persons with chronic medical conditions; and 3) expand rehabilitation therapists’ capacity to meet existing, evolving, and future societal health care needs through development and application of clinical innovations and technology. Her teaching emphasis includes normal and pathologic gait, orthotics, prosthetics, and biomechanics.